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Lundy Lighthouses
Lundy Island, Bristol Channel, north of Devon, UK
associated engineer
Sir Thomas Matthews
date  1893 - 1897
era  Victorian  |  category  Lighthouse  |  reference  SS130481
ICE reference number  HEW 1429
Lundy Island is an outcrop of dark granite, some 5.6km long and 1.2km wide, surrounded by sharp rocky reefs. Thomas Matthews, then chief engineer of Trinity House, replaced the original lighthouse on Beacon Hill with a pair of lighthouses at the north west and south east extremities of the island in 1893.
The north lighthouse has a cylindrical white painted brick tower 17.1m high to the gallery, which is 50.3m above sea level. There are two adjacent single-storey keepers' cottages. The light was produced originally from a 75mm petroleum vapour burner.
In 1970-71, the light was modernised by I.C. Clingan, a later chief engineer of Trinity House, when electricity was installed. The lamp was a fourth order dioptric with an intensity of 611,620 candela.
The north lighthouse was automated in 1985, and converted to use solar power in 1991, when the electric light was extinguished. A new lantern was installed on the disused fog signal building. The lamp has a 14W tungsten filament, and the optic is an Orga rotating beacon flashing white once every 15 seconds. It has an intensity of 11,740 candela and a range of 31.5km.
The south lighthouse has a cylindrical white painted brick tower 15.8m high to the gallery, which is 53.3m above sea level. There are two adjacent single-storey keepersí cottages. The lamp was a fourth order dioptric with an intensity of 587,160 candela.
A ground level helicopter pad was added to the complex in 1989.
The south lighthouse was automated and converted to use solar power in 1994. The lamp in the lantern was replaced with a 12V 35W etched tungsten halogen filament. The optic is an Orga rotating beacon flashing white once every 5 seconds, with an intensity of 11,100 candela and a range of 27.8km. The fog signal, mounted atop the lantern, gives a two second blast every 25 seconds.
Both Lundy lighthouses are monitored and controlled remotely from Trinity House's central planning unit at Harwich, Essex. The two sites are open to the public, although the lighthouses themselves are not open. Lundy Island is owned by the National Trust and managed by the Landmark Trust.
Supervising engineer (1970-1): I.C. Clingan
Research: ECPK
bibliography
www.bbc.co.uk
www.trinityhouse.co.uk
www.unc.edu
reference sources   CEH South
Location

Lundy Lighthouses